In July 2014 the Telegraph reported.

Peter McKelvie, who worked on the conviction of paedophile Peter Righton, said there was a “powerful elite” of paedophiles who carried out “the worst form” of abuse.

There is evidence linking the former politicians to an alleged paedophile network, he said.

Lord Warner, the former health minister, said the allegations were credible.

Mr McKelvie triggered a police investigation in 2012 when he revealed there were seven boxes of potential evidence of a powerful paedophile network, including letters between Righton and other paedophiles, being stored by West Mercia Police.

The former child protection manager in Hereford and Worcestershire said: “I believe there is a lot of strong evidence, and information that can be converted into evidence if it is investigated properly, that there has been an extremely powerful elite, amongst the highest levels of the political classes, for as long as I have been alive.

“There has been sufficient reason to investigate it over and over again certainly for the past thirty years, and there has always been a block, and the cover-up and collusion, to prevent that happening.”

“We are looking at the Lords, the Commons, the judiciary – all institutions where there will be a small percentage of paedophiles, and a slightly larger percentage of people who have known about it but have felt in terms of their own self-interest and self-preservation and for political party reasons it has been safer cover it up rather than deal with it,” he told the BBC.

“I would say we are looking at upwards of 20 [people] and a much larger number of people who have known about it and done nothing about it, who were in a position to do something about it,” he said.

The alleged abuse involved rape, beatings and being moved between paedophiles “like a lump of meat”.

Lord Warner, the former Labour health minister, said the claims were “possibly true”.

Children’s homes provided “supply lines” for child abuse and were targeted by “people in power” during the 1980s, he said.

“Sexual abuse of children is a power drive, that’s what a lot of it is about.

“What I am suggesting is that it’s possible that people who were authoritative, powerful, in particular communities did sometimes have access to children’s homes.

“I had to fire two managers of children’s homes… for abusing children in their care.”

 

Charles Napier: Former treasurer of the Paedophile Information Exchange. The ex-teacher is said to have conducted ‘campaign of abuse’ at the school where he worked in the late 1960s and early 1970s, grooming and assaulting 21 victims aged as young as eight.

The Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE) was a British pro-paedophile activist group, founded in October 1974 and officially disbanded in 1984. It was described by the BBC in 2007 as “an international organisation of people who trade obscene material.”

In March 2014, evidence emerged that PIE had received grants totalling £70,000 from the Home Office, after a whistleblower told police he witnessed a successful three-year grant renewal application for £35,000 in 1980, implying that a similar grant had been made in 1977.

Other senior figures involved?

In October 2016 the Guardian reported

A former police superintendent has been found guilty of sexually abusing boys in the 1980s at a Home Office attendance centre for young offenders and at a children’s home.

Gordon Anglesea, 79, becomes the highest-profile offender brought to justice through the National Crime Agency’s Operation Pallial, which has been investigating allegations of widespread and organised child abuse in north Wales.

Judge Geraint Walters gave Anglesea bail but made it clear he would be jailed when he is sentenced next month. Before leaving court, the judge said the defendant, a father of five, would have to sign the sex offenders’ register.

A man in the public gallery overlooking the court shouted: “This is a great day for British justice! Thirty years we’ve waited for this.”

Anglesea had faced claims for a quarter of a century that he preyed on young boys, and in the mid-90s was awarded £375,000 in damages after successfully suing news organisations that had linked him to abuse.

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