Three words every man loves to hear from his girlfriend.

Cup of tea?

That is as a question not a demand obviously.

Roll a spliff.

Only the best thing to hear from anybody really. Especially if followed by the next one.

I got weed.

That is a rarity.

I’ll watch anything.

Really? Even a crazy documentary about demonic entities manipulating and destroying our world at the same time of enslaving the people that love them and are blinded by them? Didn’t think so.

I will pay!

I’m broke so you’d better.

Yours is bigger.

They’re probably bullshitting except when talking to me, mines huge.

Thats all I got.

Jose Mujica; The Uruguayan Legend.

José Alberto “Pepe” Mujica Cordano is a Uruguayan politician and legend who was the 40th President of Uruguay between 2010 and 2015. He was famous for being the world poorest president and he was known to donate 90% of his £12000 monthly salary to charities that benefit poor people and small entrepreneurs!

He is quoted as saying “I’m called the poorest President in the world but I don’t feel poor. Poor people are those who work only to keep an expensive lifestyle and always want more.” He has been described as “the world’s ‘humblest’ president.” Citizens from nations like the UK, USA and all through the Western World should take note of this man. He is living proof that politicians do not need to be money obsessed and possessed drones, there is an alternative and it is not as unrealistic as some might think.

In September 2013, Mujica addressed the United Nations General Assembly, with a very long speech devoted to humanity and globalization. The speech called on the international community to strengthen efforts to preserve the planet for future generations and highlighted the power of the financial systems and the impact of economic fallout on ordinary people. He urged a return to simplicity, with lives founded on human relationships, love, friendship, adventure, solidarity and family, instead of lives shackled to the economy and the markets.

On 1 March 2015, Mujica’s term as president came to an end. According to BBC correspondent Wyre Davies, “Mujica left office with a relatively healthy economy and with social stability those bigger neighbours could only dream of.”

José Alberto “Pepe” Mujica Cordano deserves huge respect and recognition for his compassion. The people of Uruguay also deserve maximum respect for their choice in leader.

CONSPIRACY DVDs FOR SALE 2016 (ILLUMINATI, UFO, ANCIENT MYTHOLOGY, NEW WORLD ORDER AND MORE)

ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY (PRICES ABROAD MAY DIFFER.)

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ALL VIDEOS IN STOCK MORE COMING SOON!

After payment text the list of wanted DVDs to 07432277977 or 447432277977 from abroad and wait for reply. The order will be posted the following working day that payment and text  is received. 

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Text, Whats app or email “wolvoman80@gmail.com” YOUR FULL ADDRESS (INCLUDING POSTCODE) FOLLOWED BY

For one of each DVD text, whats app or email wolvoman80@gmail.com  “all 7”

Text  A + amount wanted for FUCK THE SYSTEM 1 AND 2 (over three and half hours)

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Text D + amount wanted for SIGNS OF THE ILLUMINATI? (119 min)

Text E + amount wanted FUCK THE SYSTEM 3 (106 min)

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This disk may not be playable on all devices (PS4s, some DVD players and other devices sorry about that.)

If this is the case you can easily transfer the data on the disk to a USB, memory stick or your PC as many times as you wish!

To copy simply put disk into PC or Laptop and select open folder to view files, left click the DVD image and send to USB, Documents or where ever you wish to save it. 

Once the data is on a USB it will play on the PS4 (through media player) and the XBOX ONE.

 shoppin

Jack Johnson Documentary.

Rare Jack Johnson Documentary

A very good and interesting documentary about heavyweight boxing legend and the first black heavyweight champion Jack Johnson. The documentary shows his struggle against the racist oppressive establishment and the ignorance of the masses. Jack Johnson seems to have handled the situation like a true legend.

Jack Johnson quote

A Biblical Alternative To The Sinner’s Prayer by Paul Washer.

I JUST HAD TO SHARE THIS VIDEO.

The work and ministry of sermonindex can be encapsulated in this one word: REVIVAL. sermonindex is not a organisation, business, or any attempt by man to build something for God. It is rather a expression of a heart burden to see the Church revived and brought back to holiness, purity, and power with God. “The mission of SermonIndex is the preservation and propogation of classical vintage preaching and the promotion of genuine biblical revival to this generation.” To download more sermons visit SermonIndex at: http://www.sermonindex.net

Paul David Washer (born 1961) is the founder, director and missions coordinator of HeartCry Missionary Society,[1] which supports indigenous missionary work.[2] Washer’s sermons tend to have an evangelistic focus on the gospel and the doctrine of the assurance of salvation and predestination, and he frequently speaks against modern church practices such as the sinner’s prayer, and a focus on numerical church growth.

Washer says he had a born again experience while studying to become an oil and gas lawyer at the University of Texas. Upon graduation, he attended Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and achieved a Master of Divinity degree. He moved to Peru where he became a missionary proclaiming the gospel for 10 years, after which time he returned to the United States. Washer resides in Radford, VA,[3] where he lives with his wife and three children.

66 LABOUR TERRORIST SUPPORTERS AND SYMPATHIZERS.

Below is a list of the 66 warmongering Labour MPs that have voted against public opinion and in favour of David Cameron’s proposed attacks on Syria. Whatever follows is down to these people!

lab-66
lab

lab-2

lab-3

lab-4

lab-5

I am shocked that a son of Tony Benn would vote in favour of the war.

lab-6

lab-7

lab-8

lab-9

lab-10

lab-11

lab-12

lab-13

lab-14

lab-15

lab-16

AN APOLOGY TO WHOEVER MY VIEWS HAVE OFFENDED?

I have noticed many times in recent years that certain individuals seem to get offended with what I say or think. Even close friends, family and people I love and loved for many years have expressed huge disapproval of my opinions and beliefs. I have been told I talk paranoid bullshit and advised to shut my mouth more than once in fact numerous people have reacted in a similar fashion. This used to annoy and offend me I used to find people offensive for finding me offensive and this would usually lead to me arguing with stupid people, ignorant people and the trouble with arguing with stupid people is they bring you down to their level.

Recently I was accused of lunacy for quoting what I thought was a Martin Luther quote “The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who remain neutral in times of great moral conflict” turns out it could have actually been a Dante Alighieri quote but that is irrelevant! Does believing that we have a moral responsibility to stand up for the oppressed and poor make me a lunatic? Or is it the fact that I believe in Heaven, Hell, Jesus and God that makes me mad? Ask yourself what YOU believe.

You believe we should just look the other way and ignore terrorism until it happens in France than you “stand united against terrorism” what’s wrong? Is it because its a bit to close to home or because it’s middle class white people that upsets you? Because lets be honest terrorism and war crimes committed by our elected government paid for by your taxes has caused more terror around the world than any Islamic state and most people do not batter an eye lid at that.

You believe in working your hands to the bone but you still own the same as most own (including me) NOTHING. You believe in the education system yet you are uneducated and unknowledgeable because of the education system combined with social programming through the entertainment industry. You would willingly work your whole life for a lame wage for a business that makes billions, exploits people all other the world and pays no tax but you cannot acknowledge or even look at the affect that we and our lifestyles have on the rest of the world. To me that is lunacy! I believe that if people take more notice of what is really happening look past the propaganda of the mainstream media just look at the clear FACTS, not the “reasons” for the mass murders and war crimes our government have committed or the “excuses” just the facts you will see the truth.

So will I apologize to those my beliefs have offended? WILL I FUCK! Will I shut up? Yes I will, when I am dead, until than I would advise you not to read my blogs, watch my videos, talk to me or message me with threats because it will probably end up with you feeling even more offended than you already are!

hell3

 

hell-1

ADELE

What am I doing right now?

The answer is listening to Adele!

Why would I be listening to Adele?

I am trying to understand what this huge obsession is that so many people seem to have about Adele, “Hello” has recently hit half a billion hits on YouTube. I know modern day music is shit and Adele is undoubtedly less shit than most but I don’t think she is anything special! In fact I think she is overrated and her being so overrated is mainly due to the poor quality of corporate music, after listening to shit like Justin Bieber and Nicki Minaj anything that is not corporate pop shit, sounds amazing even if it is just corporate middle of the road shit.

I have never rated Adele, I’m not saying she is shit I’m just saying she ain’t as good as everyone seems to think she is. I find her music boring, soft, whiny, depressing and full of self pity, I much prefer to listen to something a little more motivational. I admit she is better than the bad bunch we have at the moment but she ain’t brilliant. All I see is a miserable fat girl singing average, middle of the road songs about being a miserable fat girl!

Call me old fashioned if like but give me Guns n Roses, Johnny Cash, Rage against the machine or the Prodigy any day and turn this self pitying shit off.

adele

 

NIKOLA TESLA.

 

AN4

Nikola Tesla (Serbian Cyrillic: Никола Тесла; 10 July 1856 – 7 January 1943) was a Serbian American[3][4][5][6] inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.[7] Tesla gained experience in telephony and electrical engineering before emigrating to the United States in 1884 to work for Thomas Edison in New York City. He soon struck out on his own with financial backers, setting up laboratories and companies to develop a range of electrical devices. His patented AC induction motor and transformer were licensed by George Westinghouse, who also hired Tesla for a short time as a consultant. His work in the formative years of electric power development was involved in a corporate alternating current/direct current “War of Currents” as well as various patent battles. Tesla went on to pursue his ideas of wireless lighting and electricity distribution in his high-voltage, high-frequency power experiments in New York and Colorado Springs, and made early (1893) pronouncements on the possibility of wireless communication with his devices. He tried to put these ideas to practical use in his ill-fated attempt at intercontinental wireless transmission, which was his unfinished Wardenclyffe Tower project.[8] In his lab he also conducted a range of experiments with mechanical oscillators/generators, electrical discharge tubes, and early X-ray imaging. He also built a wireless controlled boat, one of the first ever exhibited. Tesla was renowned for his achievements and showmanship, eventually earning him a reputation in popular culture as an archetypal “mad scientist”.[9] His patents earned him a considerable amount of money, much of which was used to finance his own projects with varying degrees of success.[10]:121,154 He lived most of his life in a series of New York hotels, through his retirement. He died on 7 January 1943.[11] His work fell into relative obscurity after his death, but in 1960 the General Conference on Weights and Measures named the SI unit of magnetic flux density the tesla in his honor.[12] There has been a resurgence in interest in Tesla in popular culture since the 1990s.[13]

QUOTES-1

 

AC and the induction motor Drawing from U.S. Patent 381,968, illustrating principle of Tesla’s alternating current induction motor In late 1886 Tesla met Alfred S. Brown, a Western Union superintendent, and New York attorney Charles F. Peck. The two men were experienced in setting up companies and promoting inventions and patents for financial gain.[49] Based on Tesla’s patents and other ideas they agreed to back him financially and handle his patents. Together in April 1887 they formed the Tesla Electric Company with an agreement that profits from generated patents would go 1/3 to Tesla, 1/3 to Peck and Brown, and 1/3 to fund development.[49] They set up a laboratory for Tesla at 89 Liberty Street in Manhattan where he worked on improving and developing new types of electric motors, generators and other devices. One of the things Tesla developed at that laboratory in 1887 was an induction motor that ran on alternating current, a power system format that was starting to be built in Europe and the US because of its advantages in long distance high voltage transmission. The motor used polyphase current which generated a rotating magnetic field to turn the motor (a principle Tesla claimed to have conceived of in 1882).[50][51][52] This innovative electric motor, patented in May 1888, was a simple self-starting design that did not need a commutator, thus avoiding sparking and the high maintenance of constantly servicing and replacing mechanical brushes.[53][54] In 1888, the editor of Electrical World magazine, Thomas Commerford Martin (a friend and publicist), arranged for Tesla to demonstrate his alternating current system, including his induction motor, at the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (now IEEE).[55] Engineers working for the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company reported to George Westinghouse that Tesla had a viable AC motor and related power system—something to which Westinghouse had been trying to secure patents. Westinghouse looked into getting a patent on a similar commutatorless rotating magnetic field based induction motor presented in a paper in March 1888 by the Italian physicist Galileo Ferraris but decided Tesla’s patent would probably control the market.[56][57] Nikola Tesla’s AC dynamo-electric machine (AC Electric generator) in an 1888 U.S. Patent 390,721 In July 1888, Brown and Peck negotiated a licensing deal with George Westinghouse for Tesla’s polyphase induction motor and transformer designs for $60,000 in cash and stock and a royalty of $2.50 per AC horsepower produced by each motor. Westinghouse also hired Tesla for one year for the large fee of $2,000 ($52,700 in today’s dollars[58]) per month to be a consultant at the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company’s Pittsburgh labs.[59] During that year, Tesla worked in Pittsburgh, helping to create an alternating current system to power the city’s streetcars. He found the time there frustrating because of conflicts between him and the other Westinghouse engineers over how best to implement AC power. Between them, they settled on a 60-cycle AC current system Tesla proposed (to match the working frequency of Tesla’s motor), although they soon found that, since Tesla’s induction motor could only run at a constant speed, it would not work for street cars. They ended up using a DC traction motor instead.[60][61] War of Currents Tesla’s demonstration of his induction motor and Westinghouse’s subsequent licensing of the patent, both in 1888, put Tesla firmly on the “AC” side of the so-called “War of Currents,”[62] an electrical distribution battle being waged between Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse that had been simmering since Westinghouse’s first AC system in 1886 and had reached the point of all out warfare by 1888.[63][64][65] This started out as a competition between rival lighting systems with Edison holding all the patents for DC and the incandescent light and Westinghouse using his own patented AC system to power arc lights as well as incandescent lamps of a slightly different design to get around the Edison patent.[66] The acquisition of a feasible AC motor gave Westinghouse a key patent in building a completely integrated AC system, but the financial strain of buying up patents and hiring the engineers needed to build it meant development of Tesla’s motor had to be put on hold for a while.[67] The competition resulted in Edison Machine Works pursuing AC development in 1890 and by 1892 Thomas Edison was no longer in control of his own company, which was consolidated into the conglomerate General Electric and converting to an AC delivery system at that point. “Tesla Polyphase System” A Westinghouse display of the “Tesla Polyphase System” at Chicago’s 1893 Columbian Exposition At the beginning of 1893 Westinghouse engineer Benjamin Lamme had made great progress developing an efficient version of Tesla’s induction motor and Westinghouse Electric started branding their complete polyphase phase AC system as the “Tesla Polyphase System”, noting how they believed Tesla’s patents gave them patent priority over other AC systems.[68] In 1893, George Westinghouse won the bid to light the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago with alternating current, beating out a General Electric bid by one million dollars.[69] This World’s Fair devoted a building to electrical exhibits. It was a key event in the history of AC power, as Westinghouse demonstrated the safety, reliability, and efficiency of a fully integrated alternating current system to the American public.[70][71] At the Columbian Exposition, under a banner announcing the “Tesla Polyphase System”, Tesla demonstrated a series of electrical effects previously performed throughout America and Europe,[10]:76 included using high-voltage, high-frequency alternating current to light a wireless gas-discharge lamp.[10]:79 An observer noted: Within the room was suspended two hard-rubber plates covered with tin foil. These were about fifteen feet apart, and served as terminals of the wires leading from the transformers. When the current was turned on, the lamps or tubes, which had no wires connected to them, but lay on a table between the suspended plates, or which might be held in the hand in almost any part of the room, were made luminous. These were the same experiments and the same apparatus shown by Tesla in London about two years previous, “where they produced so much wonder and astonishment”.[72] Tesla also explained the principles of the rotating magnetic field in an induction motor by demonstrating how to make a copper egg stand on end using a device he constructed known as the Egg of Columbus.[73] Niagara and patents In 1893 Richard Dean Adams, who headed up the Niagara Falls Cataract Construction Company sought Tesla’s opinion on what system would be best to transmit power generated at the falls. Over several years there had been an off again – on again series of proposals and open competitions on how best to utilize power generated by the falls with many systems being proposed by several US and European companies including two phase and three phase AC, high voltage DC, and even compressed air. Adams pumped Tesla for information about the current state of all the competing systems. Tesla advised Adams that a two phased system would be the most reliable, and that there was a Westinghouse system to light incandescent bulbs using two phase alternating current. Based on Tesla’s advice and Westinghouse’s demonstration that they could build a complete AC system at the Colombian Exposition, a contract for building a two phase AC generating system at the Niagara Falls was awarded to Westinghouse Electric. A further contract to build the AC distribution system was awarded to General Electric.[74] The mid 1890s saw the conglomerate General Electric, backed by financier J. P. Morgan, involved in take over attempts and patent battles with Westinghouse Electric. Although a patent sharing agreement was signed between the two companies in 1896[75] Westinghouse was still cash strapped from the financial warfare. To secure further loans Westinghouse was forced to revisit Tesla’s AC patent, which bankers considered a financial strain on the company[76][77] (at that point Westinghouse had paid out an estimated $200,000 in licenses and royalties to Tesla, Brown, and Peck[78]). In 1897, Westinghouse explained his financial difficulties to Tesla in stark terms, saying that if things continue the way they were he would no longer be in control of Westinghouse Electric and Tesla would have to “deal with the bankers” to try to collect future royalties. Westinghouse convinced Tesla to release his company from the licensing agreement over Tesla’s AC patents in exchange for Westinghouse Electric purchasing the patents for a lump sum payment of $216,000;[79] this provided Westinghouse a break from what, due to alternating current’s rapid gain in popularity, had turned out to be an overly generous $2.50 per AC horsepower royalty.[59] American citizenship On 30 July 1891, at the age of 35, Tesla became a naturalized citizen of the United States,[80] and established his South Fifth Avenue laboratory, and later another at 46 E. Houston Street, in New York. He lit electric lamps wirelessly at both locations, demonstrating the potential of wireless power transmission.[81] In the same year, he patented the Tesla coil.[82] Tesla served as vice president of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, the forerunner (along with the Institute of Radio Engineers) of the modern-day IEEE, from 1892 to 1894.[83] X-ray experimentation X-ray of a hand, taken by Tesla Starting in 1894, Tesla began investigating what he referred to as radiant energy of “invisible” kinds after he had noticed damaged film in his laboratory in previous experiments[84][85] (later identified as “Roentgen rays” or “X-Rays”). His early experiments were with Crookes tubes, a cold cathode electrical discharge tube. Soon after, much of Tesla’s early research—hundreds of invention models, plans, notes, laboratory data, tools, photographs, valued at $50,000—was lost in the 5th Avenue laboratory fire of March 1895. Tesla is quoted by The New York Times as saying, “I am in too much grief to talk. What can I say?”[86] Tesla may have inadvertently captured an X-ray image (predating Wilhelm Röntgen’s December 1895 announcement of the discovery of x-rays by a few weeks) when he tried to photograph Mark Twain illuminated by a Geissler tube, an earlier type of gas discharge tube. The only thing captured in the image was the metal locking screw on the camera lens.[10]:134 In March 1896, after hearing of Wilhelm Röntgen’s discovery of X-ray and X-ray imaging (radiography),[87] Tesla proceeded to do his own experiments in X-ray imaging, developing a high energy single terminal vacuum tube of his own design that had no target electrode and that worked from the output of the Tesla Coil (the modern term for the phenomenon produced by this device is bremsstrahlung or braking radiation). In his research, Tesla devised several experimental setups to produce X-rays. Tesla held that, with his circuits, the “instrument will … enable one to generate Roentgen rays of much greater power than obtainable with ordinary apparatus.”[88] Tesla noted the hazards of working with his circuit and single-node X-ray-producing devices. In his many notes on the early investigation of this phenomenon, he attributed the skin damage to various causes. He believed early on that damage to the skin was not caused by the Roentgen rays, but by the ozone generated in contact with the skin, and to a lesser extent, by nitrous acid. Tesla incorrectly believed that X-rays were longitudinal waves, such as those produced in waves in plasma. These plasma waves can occur in force-free magnetic fields.[89][90] On 11 July 1934, the New York Herald Tribune published an article on Tesla, in which he recalled an event that would occasionally take place while experimenting with his single-electrode vacuum tubes; a minute particle would break off the cathode, pass out of the tube, and physically strike him. “Tesla said he could feel a sharp stinging pain where it entered his body, and again at the place where it passed out.” In comparing these particles with the bits of metal projected by his “electric gun,” Tesla said, “The particles in the beam of force … will travel much faster than such particles … and they will travel in concentrations.”[91] Radio Wireless transmission of power and energy demonstration during his 1891 lecture on high frequency and potential Tesla’s theories on the possibility of the transmission by radio waves go back as far as lectures and demonstrations in 1893 in St. Louis, Missouri, the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and the National Electric Light Association.[92] Tesla’s demonstrations and principles were written about widely through various media outlets.[93] Many devices such as the Tesla Coil were used in the further development of radio.[94] In 1898, Tesla demonstrated a radio-controlled boat (U.S. Patent 613,809 —Method of an Apparatus for Controlling Mechanism of Moving Vehicle or Vehicles). Tesla’s radio wave experiments in 1896 were conducted in Gerlach Hotel (later renamed The Radio Wave building), where he resided.[95] In 1898, Tesla demonstrated a radio-controlled boat—which he dubbed “teleautomaton”—to the public during an electrical exhibition at Madison Square Garden.[46] The crowd that witnessed the demonstration made outrageous claims about the workings of the boat, such as magic, telepathy, and being piloted by a trained monkey hidden inside.[96] Tesla tried to sell his idea to the U.S. military as a type of radio-controlled torpedo, but they showed little interest.[97] Remote radio control remained a novelty until World War I and afterward, when a number of countries used it in military programs.[98] Tesla took the opportunity to further demonstrate “Teleautomatics” in an address to a meeting of the Commercial Club in Chicago, while he was travelling to Colorado Springs, on 13 May 1899.[24] In 1900, Tesla was granted patents for a “system of transmitting electrical energy” and “an electrical transmitter.” When Guglielmo Marconi made his famous first-ever transatlantic radio transmission in 1901, Tesla quipped that it was done with 17 Tesla patents, though there is little to support this claim.[99] This was the beginning of years of patent battles over radio with Tesla’s patents being upheld in 1903, followed by a reverse decision in favor of Marconi in 1904. In 1943, a Supreme Court of the United States decision restored the prior patents of Tesla, Oliver Lodge, and John Stone.[100] The court declared that their decision had no bearing on Marconi’s claim as the first to achieve radio transmission, just that since Marconi’s claim to certain patents were questionable, he could not claim infringement on those same patents[101] (there are claims the high court was trying to nullify a World War I claim against the U.S. government by the Marconi Company via simply restoring Tesla’s prior patent).[100] Colorado Springs See also: Magnifying transmitter and Colorado Springs Notes, 1899–1900 A multiple exposure picture (one of 68 Colorado Springs images created by of Century Magazine photographer Dickenson Alley) of Tesla sitting in his laboratory with his “Magnifying transmitter” generating millions of volts. The 7-metre (23 ft) long arcs were not part of the normal operation and were produced for effect by rapidly cycling the power switch[102] Another Alley photograph at Colorado Springs documenting 3 lights receiving power by means of electrodynamic induction from an oscillator 60 feet (18 m) from the bulbs (placed on the ground outside the building to demonstrate they had no connection to the power source)[102] On 17 May 1899, Tesla moved to Colorado Springs, where he would have room for his high-voltage, high-frequency experiments;[24] his lab was located near Foote Ave. and Kiowa St.[103] He chose this location because the polyphase alternating current power distribution system had been introduced there and he had associates who were willing to give him all the power he needed without charging for it.[104] Upon his arrival, he told reporters that he was conducting wireless telegraphy experiments, transmitting signals from Pikes Peak to Paris.[citation needed] The 1978 book Colorado Springs Notes, 1899–1900 contains descriptions of Tesla’s experiments. On 15 June 1899, Tesla performed his first experiments at his Colorado Springs lab; he recorded his initial spark length at five inches long, but very thick and noisy.[24] Tesla investigated atmospheric electricity, observing lightning signals via his receivers. Tesla stated that he observed stationary waves during this time.[105] The great distances and the nature of what Tesla was detecting from lightning storms confirmed his belief that the earth had a resonant frequency.[106][107] He produced artificial lightning (with discharges consisting of millions of volts and up to 135 feet long).[108] Thunder from the released energy was heard 15 miles away in Cripple Creek, Colorado. People walking along the street observed sparks jumping between their feet and the ground. Sparks sprang from water line taps when touched. Light bulbs within 100 feet of the lab glowed even when turned off. Horses in a livery stable bolted from their stalls after receiving shocks through their metal shoes. Butterflies were electrified, swirling in circles with blue halos of St. Elmo’s fire around their wings.[109] While experimenting, Tesla inadvertently faulted a power station generator, causing a power outage. In August 1917, Tesla explained what had happened in The Electrical Experimenter: “As an example of what has been done with several hundred kilowatts of high frequency energy liberated, it was found that the dynamos in a power house six miles away were repeatedly burned out, due to the powerful high frequency currents set up in them, and which caused heavy sparks to jump through the windings and destroy the insulation!”[110] An Alley Colorado Springs photo of a grounded tuned coil in resonance with a transmitter illuminates a light near the bottom of the picture.[111] Tesla did not disclose how far away the transmitter was.[102][111] During his time at his lab, Tesla observed unusual signals from his receiver which he concluded may be communications from another planet. He mentioned them in a letter to reporter Julian Hawthorne at the Philadelphia North American on 8 December 1899[112] and in a December 1900 letter about possible discoveries in the new century to the Red Cross Society where he referred to messages “from another world” that read “1… 2… 3…”.[113][114] Reporters treated it as a sensational story and jumped to the conclusion Tesla was hearing signals from Mars.[113] He expanded on the signals he heard in a 9 February 1901 Collier’s Weekly article “Talking With Planets” where he said it had not been immediately apparent to him that he was hearing “intelligently controlled signals” and that the signals could come from Mars, Venus, or other planets.[115] It has been hypothesized that he may have intercepted Marconi’s European experiments in July 1899—Marconi may have transmitted the letter S (dot/dot/dot) in a naval demonstration, the same three impulses that Tesla hinted at hearing in Colorado[116]—or signals from another experimenter in wireless transmission.[117] In 1899, John Jacob Astor IV invested $100,000 for Tesla to further develop and produce a new lighting system. Instead, Tesla used the money to fund his Colorado Springs experiments.[118] On 7 January 1900, Tesla left Colorado Springs.[citation needed] His lab was torn down in 1904, and its contents were sold two years later to satisfy a debt.[119][120] The Colorado experiments had prepared Tesla for the establishment of the trans-Atlantic wireless telecommunications facility known as Wardenclyffe near Shoreham, Long Island.[121] Wardenclyffe years (1900–1917) Main article: Wardenclyffe Tower Tesla Ready for Business – 7 August 1901 New-York tribune article The Tesla coil wireless transmitter U.S. Patent 1,119,732 Tesla’s Wardenclyffe plant on Long Island in 1904. From this facility, Tesla hoped to demonstrate wireless transmission of electrical energy across the Atlantic. In 1900, with $150,000 ($4,266,600 in today’s dollars[58]; 51% from J. Pierpont Morgan), Tesla began planning the Wardenclyffe Tower facility.[122] Tesla later approached Morgan to ask for more funds to build a more powerful transmitter. When asked where all the money had gone, Tesla responded by saying that he was affected by the Panic of 1901, which he (Morgan) had caused. Morgan was shocked by the reminder of his part in the stock market crash and by Tesla’s breach of contract by asking for more funds. Tesla wrote another plea to Morgan, but it was also fruitless. Morgan still owed Tesla money on the original agreement, and Tesla had been facing foreclosure even before construction of the tower began.[117] In December 1901, Marconi successfully transmitted the letter S from England to Newfoundland, terminating Tesla’s relationship with Morgan.[improper synthesis?] Over the next five years, Tesla wrote over 50 letters to Morgan, pleading for and demanding additional funding to complete the construction of Wardenclyffe. Tesla continued the project for another nine months. The tower was erected to its full 187 feet (57 m).[117] In July 1903, Tesla wrote to Morgan that in addition to wireless communication, Wardenclyffe would be capable of wireless transmission of electric power.[122] On 14 October 1904, Morgan finally replied through his secretary, stating, “It will be impossible for [me] to do anything in the matter,” after Tesla had written to Morgan when the financier was meeting with the Archbishop of Canterbury in an attempt to appeal to his Christian spirit.[117] In June 1902, Tesla’s lab operations were moved to Wardenclyffe from Houston Street.[122] On his 50th birthday in 1906, Tesla demonstrated his 200 horsepower (150 kilowatts) 16,000 rpm bladeless turbine. During 1910–1911 at the Waterside Power Station in New York, several of his bladeless turbine engines were tested at 100–5,000 hp.[123] Tesla invented a steam-powered mechanical oscillator—Tesla’s oscillator. While experimenting with mechanical oscillators at his Houston Street lab, Tesla allegedly generated a resonance of several buildings. As the speed grew, it is said that the machine oscillated at the resonance frequency of his own building and, belatedly realizing the danger, he was forced to use a sledge hammer to terminate the experiment, just as the police arrived.[16]:162–164 In February 1912, an article—”Nikola Tesla, Dreamer” by Allan L. Benson—was published in World Today, in which an artist’s illustration appears showing the entire earth cracking in half with the caption, “Tesla claims that in a few weeks he could set the earth’s crust into such a state of vibration that it would rise and fall hundreds of feet and practically destroy civilization. A continuation of this process would, he says, eventually split the earth in two.”[91] Tesla theorized that the application of electricity to the brain enhanced intelligence. In 1912, he crafted “a plan to make dull students bright by saturating them unconsciously with electricity,” wiring the walls of a schoolroom and, “saturating [the schoolroom] with infinitesimal electric waves vibrating at high frequency. The whole room will thus, Mr. Tesla claims, be converted into a health-giving and stimulating electromagnetic field or ‘bath.'”[124] The plan was, at least provisionally approved by then superintendent of New York City schools, William H. Maxwell.[124] Before World War I, Tesla sought overseas investors. After the war started, Tesla lost the funding he was receiving from his patents in European countries. Eventually, he sold Wardenclyffe for $20,000 ($472,500 in today’s dollars[58]).[122] In 1917, around the time that the Wardenclyffe Tower was demolished by Boldt to make the land a more viable real estate asset, Tesla received AIEE’s highest honor, the Edison Medal.[125] In the August 1917 edition of the magazine Electrical Experimenter Tesla postulated that electricity could be used to locate submarines via using the reflection of an “electric ray” of “tremendous frequency,” with the signal being viewed on a fluorescent screen (a system that has been noted to have a superficial resemblance to modern radar).[126] Tesla was incorrect in his assumption that high frequency radio waves would penetrate water[127] but Émile Girardeau, who helped develop France’s first radar system in the 1930s, noted in 1953 that Tesla’s general speculation that a very strong high frequency signal would be needed was correct stating “(Tesla) was prophesying or dreaming, since he had at his disposal no means of carrying them out, but one must add that if he was dreaming, at least he was dreaming correctly.”[10]:266[128]

 

 

FACEBOOK EXPOSES THE STUPID AND SELF OBSESSED SOCIETY WE LIVE IN.

Funniest Facebook fails.

DISCLAIMER.

None of the Facebook fails below are my original content nor do I know anybody involved. If you see yourself on this website and feel offended and angry at me, then don’t, these pictures have probably already gone viral before I used them! Be angry at yourself for being so silly and foolish that you end up in this situation in the first place.

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We should never judge anybody, but fucking hell.
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She does look a bit like a skanky hoe TBH.
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UGH! girl with lame brain writes ignorant and shit on Facebook.
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Learn to speak American? Does he mean Native American? If so, hear hear. No he does not he is just an idiot. Lovin his friend though.
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I hate it when this happens, not getting stuck in a escalator getting stuck in a conversation with an idiot.
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Now I am going to rape their gerbil!
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Will somebody please acknowledge that I fucking exist.

 

fb11
Thank you.
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I would end this conversation ASAP.

 

fb13
Don’t let your dying great grandmother spoil your plans.

 

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Predictive text is a pain in the ass.
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Always double check your picture AND learn how to use your phone.

NEVER CONFORM.

A few quotes on conformity.

QUOTE-Tom DeLonge
Tom DeLonge
QUOTES
Virginia Wolf, Quotes.
Nikola Tesla
Nikola Tesla
GUY FAWKES
GUY FAWKES
QUOTES-4
Matthew 7:13
J.Frank Dobie
J.Frank Dobie
William Penn
William Penn
George Orwell
George Orwell
QUOTES-8
Kurt Cobain
Peter 1 : 14-15
Peter 1 : 14-15
Rollo May
Rollo May
Banker elites
Banker elites
Romans
Roman 12:2

WM806

CLEMENT RICHARD ATTLEE.

Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC, FRS (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was a British politician who was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951 and the Leader of the Labour Party from 1935 to 1955. Attlee was the first person to hold the office of Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, serving under Winston Churchill in the wartime coalition government, before going on to lead the Labour Party to a landslide election victory in 1945 and a narrow victory in 1950. He became the first Labour Prime Minister ever to serve a full five-year term, as well as the first to command a Labour majority in Parliament, and remains the longest-ever serving Leader of the Labour Party.

First elected to Parliament in 1922 as the MP for Limehouse, Attlee rose quickly to become a minister in the minority government led by Ramsay MacDonald in 1924. In 1931, after Labour suffered a heavy election defeat, he was elected its Deputy Leader. Four years later, he became the Leader of the Labour Party after the resignation of George Lansbury. At first advocating pacificism and appeasement, he later reversed his position and by 1938 became a strong critic of Neville Chamberlain’s attempts to appease Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini. He subsequently took Labour into the Churchill war ministry in 1940. Initially serving as Lord Privy Seal, he was appointed Deputy Prime Minister two years later. With the end of the Second World War in Europe in May 1945, the coalition government was dissolved and Attlee led Labour to win a huge majority in the ensuing general election two months later.

clement-attlee-005

The government he led built the post-war consensus, based upon the assumption that full employment would be maintained by Keynesian policies and that a greatly enlarged system of social services would be created – aspirations that had been outlined in the wartime Beveridge Report. Within this context, his government undertook the nationalisation of public utilities and major industries, as well as the creation of the National Health Service. After initial Conservative opposition to Keynesian fiscal policy, this settlement was broadly accepted by all parties for over three decades until Margaret Thatcher became Prime Minister in 1979. His government also presided over the decolonisation of a large part of the British Empire, granting British India, Burma, and Ceylon independence, as well as ending the British Mandates of Palestine and Jordan. He strongly supported the Cold War against Soviet Communism. When the budgetary crisis forced Britain out of Greece in 1947 he called on Washington to counter the Soviet Union with the Truman Doctrine. He avidly supported theMarshall Plan to rebuild Western Europe with American money, and the NATO military alliance against the Soviet bloc. He sent British troops to fight in the Malayan Emergency in 1948. After leading Labour to a narrow victory in 1950, he sent British troops to fight in the Korean War. Attlee was narrowly defeated by Churchill in 1951; he retired as Labour leader after losing the 1955 General Election and was elevated to the House of Lords.

In public, Attlee appeared modest and unassuming; he was ineffective at public relations and lacked charisma. His strengths emerged behind the scenes, especially in committees where his depth of knowledge, quiet demeanour, objectivity and pragmatism proved decisive. He saw himself as spokesman on behalf of his entire party, and successfully kept its multiple factions in harness. His reputation among scholars in recent decades has been much higher than during his years as Prime Minister, thanks to his role in forging the welfare state and opposing Stalin in the Cold War.[1] In 2004 he was voted the greatest British Prime Minister of the 20th Century by a poll of 139 academics organised by Ipsos MORI.

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TONY BENN, HE ENCOURAGED US.

Tony Benn in the House of Commons – Iraq Bombing speech (RARE)

A very exciting and passionate speech made by Tony Benn in Parliament in 1998, warning MPs of the hundreds of innocent people that would be killed if they vote to bomb Iraq.

Sicko (Michael Moore) – Tony Benn

Sicko (Michael Moore) – Anthony “Tony” Neil Wedgwood Benn

Keeping people hopeless and pessimistic – see I think there are two ways in which people are controlled – first of all frighten people and secondly demoralize them.

benn-3

Tony Benn to BBC “If you wont broadcast the Gaza appeal then I will myself”

Tony Benn accuses the BBC ON AIR of capitulating to the Israeli Government by refusing to air an appeal for the Gazan people by the Disaster Emergency Committee (DEC) he then broadcasts the Address himself much to the consternation of the interviewer!

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Tony Benn — The issue is Thatcher

Tony Benn talks about Thatcherism and the rotten philosophies of the Tory government in the 1980s.

Clip from Benn’s ‘Speaking up in Parliament’ video, available through amazon.co.uk and elsewhere.

benn-2

HARRY PATCH QUOTES.

harry-patch

Henry John “Harry” Patch (17 June 1898 – 25 July 2009), dubbed in his latter years “the Last Fighting Tommy”, was a British supercentenarian, briefly the oldest man in Europe and the last surviving soldier known to have fought in the trenches of the First World War.[1] Patch was, with Claude Choules and Florence Green, one of the last three surviving British veterans of the First World War and with Frank Buckles and John Babcock, one of the five last known veterans in the world.[2] At the time of his death, aged 111 years, 1 month, 1 week and 1 day, Patch was the third-oldest man in the world, the oldest man in Europe and the 77th oldest man ever.

Patch was born in the village of Combe Down, near Bath, Somerset, England. He appears in the 1901 Census as a two-year-old boy along with his stonemason father William John Patch, mother Elizabeth Ann (née Morris) and older brothers George Frederick and William Thomas at a house called “Fonthill”.[3] The family are recorded at the same address “Fonthill Cottage” in the 1911 census.[4] His elder brothers are recorded as a carpenter and banker mason. Longevity ran in Patch’s family; his father lived to 82, his mother to 94, his brother George to 95 and his brother William to 87. Patch left school in 1913 and became an apprentice plumber in Bath.[5][6]

In October 1916, he was conscripted as a private into the British Army, reporting for duty at Tolland Barracks, Taunton. During the winter of 1916–17 he was promoted lance-corporal but was demoted after a fist fight with a soldier, who had taken his boots from his billet and saw no further promotion.[7] Patch went through a series of short-lived attachments to several regiments, including the Royal Warwickshire Regiment before being posted after completing training to the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry, serving as an assistant gunner in a Lewis Gun section.[8] Patch arrived in France in June 1917.[9] He fought at the Battle of Passchendaele (also known as the Third Battle of Ypres) and was injured in the groin, when a shell exploded overhead at 22:30 on 22 September 1917, killing three of his comrades. He was removed from the front line and returned to England on 23 December 1917.[9] Patch referred to 22 September as his personal Remembrance Day. He was still convalescing on the Isle of Wight when the Armistice was declared the following November.[10]

When the war ended, I don’t know if I was more relieved that we’d won or that I didn’t have to go back. Passchendaele was a disastrous battle – thousands and thousands of young lives were lost. It makes me angry. Earlier this year, I went back to Ypres to shake the hand of Charles Kuentz, Germany’s only surviving veteran from the war. It was emotional. He is 107. We’ve had 87 years to think what war is. To me, it’s a licence to go out and murder. Why should the British government call me up and take me out to a battlefield to shoot a man I never knew, whose language I couldn’t speak? All those lives lost for a war finished over a table. Now what is the sense in that?[11]

— Harry Patch

After the war, Patch returned to work as a plumber, during which time he spent four years working on the Wills Memorial Building in Bristol, before becoming manager of the plumbing company’s branch in Bristol.[12] A year above the age to be called up for military service at the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939, he became a part-timefireman in Bath, dealing with the Baedeker raids.[12] [13] Later in the war he moved to Street, Somerset, where he ran a plumbing company until his retirement at the age of 65.[12]

On 13 September 1919, Patch married, at Hadley, Shropshire, Ada Billington, who died in 1976.[14] They had two sons, both of whom predeceased him: Dennis, who died in 1984 and Roy, who died in 2002.[5] At 81, he married his second wife, Jean, who died in 1984. His third partner, Doris Whittaker, who lived in the same nursing home as him, died in 2007.[15]

Last Tommy

Patch had refused to discuss his war experiences, until approached in 1998 for the BBC One documentary Veterans, on reflection of which and with the realisation that he was part of a fast dwindling group of veterans of “the war to end all wars”.[10]

Patch was featured in the 2003 television series World War 1 in Colour and said “if any man tells you he went over the top and he wasn’t scared, he’s a damn liar.” He reflected on his lost friends and the moment when he came face to face with a German soldier. He recalled the story of Moses descending from Mount Sinai with God’s Ten Commandments, including “Thou shalt not kill” and could not bring himself to kill the German. Instead, he shot him in the shoulder, which made the soldier drop his rifle. However, he had to carry on running towards his Lewis Gun, so to proceed, he shot him above the knee, and in the ankle. Patch said,

I had about five seconds to make the decision. I brought him down, but I didn’t kill him…. Any one of them could have been me. Millions of men came to fight in this war and I find it incredible that I am the only one left.
—Commenting on graves at a Flanders war cemetery, July 2007.[16]

In November 2004, at the age of 106, Patch met Charles Kuentz, a 107-year-old Alsatian veteran, who had fought on the German side at Passchendaele (and served on the French side in World War II).[17] Patch was quoted as saying: “I was a bit doubtful before meeting a German soldier. Herr Kuentz is a very nice gentleman however. He is all for a united Europe and peace – and so am I”. Kuentz had brought along a tin of Alsatian biscuits and Patch gave him a bottle of Somerset cider in return.[18] The meeting was featured in a 2005 BBC TV programme The Last Tommy, which told the story of six of the World War I veterans still alive.[19]

In December 2004, Patch was given a present of 106 bottles of Patch’s Pride Cider, which has been named after him and produced by the Gaymer Cider Company.[20] In the spring of 2005 he was interviewed by the Todayprogramme, in which he said of the First World War: “Too many died. War isn’t worth one life” and in July 2005, Patch voiced his outrage over plans to build a motorway in northern France over cemeteries of the First World War.

On 16 December 2005, Patch was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Bristol, whose buildings he helped construct in the 1920s.[21] [22] The University’s newly restored Wills Memorial Building was reopened by Patch on 20 February 2008. He was chosen for this honour as he was a member of the workforce that originally helped build the tower, which was opened on 9 June 1925 by King George V, an event which Patch also attended.[23]

In July 2007, marking the 90th anniversary of the beginning of the Battle of Passchendaele, Patch revisited the site of the battle in Flanders, to pay his respects to the fallen on both sides. He was accompanied by a historian,Richard van Emden. On this occasion, Patch described war as the “calculated and condoned slaughter of human beings” and said that “war isn’t worth one life.”[24]

In August 2007, Patch’s autobiography The Last Fighting Tommy was published, making him one of the oldest authors ever.[25] With the proceeds from this book, Patch decided to fund an Inshore Lifeboat for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and he attended the RNLI’s Lifeboat College on 20 July 2007, to officially name the boat The Doris and Harry.[26]

In February 2008, the poet laureate of the United Kingdom Andrew Motion, was commissioned by the BBC West television programme Inside Out West, to write a poem in Patch’s honour. Entitled “The Five Acts of Harry Patch” it was first read at a special event at the Bishop’s Palace in Wells, where it was introduced by the Prince of Wales and received by Harry Patch.[27][28]

In July 2008, Wells City Council conferred the freedom of the city of Wells on Patch.[29] On 27 September 2008, in a private ceremony attended by a few people, Patch opened a memorial on the bank of the Steenbeek, at the point where he crossed the river in 1917. The memorial reads,

Here, at dawn, on 16 August 1917, the 7th Battalion, Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry, 20th (Light) Division, crossed the Steenbeek prior to their successful assault on the village on Langemarck. This stone is erected to the memory of fallen comrades, and to honour the courage, sacrifice and passing of the Great War generation. It is the gift of former Private and Lewis Gunner Harry Patch, No. 29295, C Company, 7th DCLI, the last surviving veteran to have served in the trenches of the Western Front.”[30]

In October 2008, Patch launched the 2008 Royal British Legion Poppy Appeal in Somerset.[31] On 11 November 2008, marking the 90th anniversary of the end of World War I, together with fellow veterans Henry Allingham and Bill Stone, Patch laid a commemorative wreath for the Act of Remembrance at The Cenotaph in London, escorted by Victoria Cross recipient Johnson Beharry.[32]

On 9 November 2008, the Master of the Queen’s Music, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies attended the world premiere of his choral work paying tribute to Patch. The piece sets words by the Poet Laureate, Andrew Motion and was performed at Portsmouth Cathedral by the London Mozart Players, the Portsmouth Grammar School chamber choir and the cathedral’s choristers. The creation of the work was featured in A poem for Harry, a BBC Westdocumentary that was subsequently repeated on BBC Four. The programme won a gold medal at the New York Festivals International Television Programming and Promotion Awards.[33]

On 18 July 2009, with the death of Henry Allingham, Patch became the oldest surviving veteran and also the oldest man in the United Kingdom.[34] Patch was the last trench veteran of World War I. The penultimate Western Frontveteran, the 108-year-old Fernand Goux of France, who died on 9 November 2008, fought for 8 days. He came out unscathed, unlike Patch and the last Alpine Front veteran, 110-year-old Delfino Borroni of Italy, who died on 26 October 2008. Patch was also the last surviving Tommy, since the death on 4 April 2009 of Netherwood Hughes, who was still in training when the war ended. The penultimate fighting Tommy, Andrew Rigby, died on 9 June 2006, the week before Patch’s 108th birthday. Claude Choules, the last remaining First World War naval veteran, died on 5 May 2011.[35]

We came across a lad from A company. He was ripped open from his shoulder to his waist by shrapnel and lying in a pool of blood. When we got to him, he said: ‘Shoot me’. He was beyond human help and, before we could draw a revolver, he was dead. And the final word he uttered was ‘Mother.’ I remember that lad in particular. It’s an image that has haunted me all my life, seared into my mind.
—An extract from Patch’s book The Last Fighting Tommy which was read out at his funeral by Marie-France André, the chargé d’affaires of the Belgian embassy, August 2009.[36]

Medals

Harry Patch received eight medals and honours; for his service in the First World War he received the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.[37] In 1998, as a surviving veteran of the First World War, who had fought for the Allies in France and Flanders, the President of the Republic of France a Knight of the Légion d’honneur. The award was presented to Patch on his 101st birthday. On 9 March 2009, Patch was appointed an Officer of the Légion d’honneur by the French Ambassador at his nursing home in Somerset.[38] On 7 January 2008, Albert II, King of the Belgians, conferred upon Patch the award of Knight of the Order of Leopold. He received the award from Jean-Michel Veranneman de Watervliet, Belgium’s Ambassador to the United Kingdom, at a ceremony in the Ambassador’s residence in London, on 22 September 2008, which coincidentally was the 91st anniversary of the day he waswounded in action and three of his closest friends killed.[39]

For service during the Second World War, Patch was awarded the 1939–45 Defence Medal. This was subsequently lost and on 20 September 2008, at a ceremony at Bath Fire Station, Patch was presented with a replacement medal.[40] Patch also received two commemorative medals: the National Service Medal and the Hors de combat medal, which signifies outstanding bravery of servicemen and women, who have sustained wounds or injury in the line of duty. The medals are unofficial and not a part of the official order of wear in any Commonwealth realm. In accordance with his wishes, Harry Patch’s medals are displayed at the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry Museum inBodmin.[41]

Ribbons

British War Medal Awarded 1919 Victory Medal Awarded 1919 Defence Medal Awarded 1945
Légion d'honneur (Officer) Awarded 2009 Légion d'honneur (Chevalier) Awarded 1998 Order Of Leopold (Knight) Awarded 2008
National Defence Medal (Unofficial) Hors De Combat Medal (Unofficial)

Death

Patch died at 9 a.m. on 25 July 2009, aged 111 years, one month, one week and one day. This was also seven days after the death of fellow veteran Henry Allingham, who was at the time aged 113. The Prince of Wales led the tributes to him, saying: “Today, nothing could give me greater pride than paying tribute to Harry Patch, of Somerset.”[1] Patch was the last male First World War veteran living in Europe and the last British male known to have been born in the 1890s.

Funeral

Harry Patch’s funeral procession

Patch’s funeral was held in Wells Cathedral on Thursday 6 August 2009.[42][43] At 11.00 a.m., the bells of Wells Cathedral were rung 111 times to mark each year of his life. A quarter peal of Grandsire Caters was also rung, half muffled, while quarter-peals were also rung in Bristol and at several churches around the country.[44][45] His coffin travelled from his home, Fletcher House, to the cathedral where the service commenced at noon.[46] The theme of the service was “Peace and Reconciliation” and in addition to pallbearers from The Rifles (the successor regiment to the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry), Patch’s coffin was accompanied by two private soldiers from each of the armies of Belgium, France and Germany.[43]

In accordance with Patch’s instructions, no guns were allowed at the funeral and even the officiating soldiers did not have their ceremonial weapons.[47] Due to public interest in the funeral, which was broadcast live on TV and radio, 1,050 tickets were made available for the service.[43] Some, wanting to pay their respects, slept overnight on the Cathedral Green in order to get tickets.[48] The funeral was led by the Dean of Wells, The Very Revd John Clarke and the Bishop of Taunton, The Rt Revd Peter David Maurice.[46] Among notables to attend the funeral were The Duchess of Cornwall and The Duchess of Gloucester. Patch was buried at St Michael’s Church, Monkton Combe, near his parents and brother.

Legacy

Race horse trainer and owner Michael Jarvis named a horse after Patch in 2008. Having bought the horse in October 2007, during that year’s Poppy Appeal, the Newmarket trainer decided to name him after a First World War veteran. Michael’s daughter suggested Patch after reading an article about him.[49] The horse won the 1.30 at Doncaster racecourse on 8 November 2008, the day before Remembrance Sunday. A commemorative plaque in Patch’s memory is to be placed on the Guildhall in Bath.[50]

The BBC commissioned Carol Ann Duffy, the Poet Laureate, to write a poem to mark the deaths of Patch and Henry Allingham (who died one week before Patch, on 18 July 2009). The result, Last Post, was read by Duffy on theToday programme on BBC Radio 4 on 30 July 2009, the day of Allingham’s funeral.[51]

On 5 August 2009, Radiohead released the song “Harry Patch (In Memory Of)” and lead singer Thom Yorke explained that the song was inspired by “a very emotional interview with him” in 2005, on the Today programme on BBC Radio 4. The song was sold direct from Radiohead’s website for £1, with proceeds donated to the British Legion.[52][53]

In early summer 2009, Harry recorded some spoken word parts for UK heavy metal band Imperial Vengeance, to be included on the title track to the album At the Going Down of the Sun. The song was about the horrors of the trenches and Patch read part of the poem For the Fallen.[54]

The former UK Poet Laureate, Andrew Motion composed a poem, The Death of Harry Patch, which he read for the first time on The World at One Radio 4 programme on Armistice Day 2010.[55]

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